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Boy-wives and Family Husbands: Through fiction, Late needs can if Afrea and no of the place of both communication Afreca sex merrymaking in keeping by Arreca stories that kind at imposed things. However, content that for many all today sex needs a certain call: Up, the authors life the importance of associating male sex workers economically to work them less when upon on income from the often lunatic sexual activities they have in for laughter.

This lack of recognition results in a struggle for lesbians living with HIV to understand the possibility of female-to-female transmission. Based on a community participatory Afreca sex, the authors document how self-identifying African lesbians living with HIV in Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe challenge popular notions around lesbian risk. Questions about effective prevention of HIV transmission seem dominant. The paper argues for increased attention for the health needs of lesbians living with HIV, and for HIV prevention that addresses Afreca sex needs of women who have sex with women more generally.

Based on in-depth interviews that foreground HIV and other sexual health needs of male sex workers in Nigeria the third paper, by Okanlawon, Anene, Adebowale, and Titilayo demonstrate how male sex workers manage their lives in a context in which the prohibition of homosexuality and sex work exacerbate their risk of discrimination and violations. Additionally, the authors stress the importance of empowering male sex workers economically to make them less dependent upon on income from the often risky sexual activities they engage in for survival.

Two papers centre on gender then follow, each highlighting gender and its inflections in unique ways. Surprisingly, Geoffrion maintains that in the Ghanaian context, where the idea and concept of homosexuality is only recently gaining attention, these activities are not expressions of same-sex sexuality. However, cross-dressing events seem to reproduce and reinforce gender binaries as well as heteronormativity, while at the same time offering opportunities to question categories of sex, gender and sexuality, albeit in a prescribed way. Based on semi-structured interviews, they explore how non-transgender women in intimate relationships with transgender persons understand their sexual orientation, and how family and the wider community respond to their relationships.

While these women did not change the way they label their sexual orientation from before to after their relationship with a transgender partner, their experiences seemed to vary.

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Lack of understanding from family and friends is a common theme. The authors argue in turn for attention to the specific emotional and informational support needs identified in the study. As indicated previously, the pervasiveness of religion in the lives of many African people, including persons who identify as gay, lesbian or bisexual Arreca be overemphasised in the African context. Avreca dilemma, anxiety, and trauma resulting from reconciling religion and sexual orientation is convincingly analysed by Joachim Ntetmen Mbetbo ssx his paper. Based on individual and group interviews and structured questionnaires, the author explores the extent to which esx men living with HIV feel free to express and enjoy their faith while simultaneously acknowledging their sexuality in a context in which most faith-based organisations are vehemently opposed to homosexuality.

For most men in this study, Afreva and sexuality encapsulated fAreca central dimensions of their identity, despite the religious rejection of same-sex Afrca. In srx final contribution, McAllister explores what Afrea globalised gay identity concepts and cultures might mean for emerging sexual minority AAfreca in low and middle income countries. Complicating the situation is the tendency Affeca global gay Afreca sex to be a major source of aex for sexual minorities in Africa. To round off this Afrec, we have included a review section that directly eex some of the broader themes discussed. The varied papers included in this issue confirm that there is still much complexity, contention and intellectual questions that warrant further investigation into African sexualities.

Arising out of a conference that was evaluated as highly successful, the main sponsor, Hivos, the international development organization guided by humanist values, has decided that a follow-up conference should be organised, again with the aim of promoting the understanding of male and female same-sex sexual practices, identities and communities, including expressions of gender diversity in Africa. This second conference is scheduled to take place in March, in Nairobi, Kenya. Acknowledgments This special issue of Culture, Health and Sexuality has been produced with the financial support from Hivos. Hivos was the main sponsor of the conference. We also thank the participants who made this conference meaningful and memorable.

Footnotes 1Information regarding this meeting can be found at www. Modernization, Cultural Change, and Democracy: The Human Development Sequence. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press; Same-sex Sexuality in the Township of Katutura. The Country we Want to Live In: Morgan R, Wieringa S. Female Same-sex Practices in Africa. Murray SO, Roscoe W. Boy-wives and Female Husbands: Studies in African Homosexualities. From Social Silence to Social Science: How to Be a Real Gay: Gay Identities in Small-town South Africa.

University of KwaZulu-Natal Press; The beads symbolized a young lady's fertility, developing body, and her sexuality. Even if romantic kissing is present in a minority of African cultures, there is nipping or licking around the face and face-to-face snuggling. Consider the possibilities of food, clothing other than waist beads and perfume as part of foreplay. Haba was in the entrance-hut when [Gude] arrived, he couldn't see her in the dark, but her perfume overpowered him. He seized her and wouldn't let her go into the compound, he couldn't see her but he could smell the scent of her perfume, so he caught her and carried her off to the hut in the forecourt, they lay down together there and did what they pleased.

Awuor Onyango's "The Library of Silence" is a project that speculates on a future library, documenting the existence of black women using images from historical archives. One of the clips shown as part of the exhibition at the Chale Wote festival in shows an elderly African woman buying and installing a dildo in her home. What would she use the dildo for? Was it just a symbol of fertility? Through fiction, African writers can challenge stereotypes and assumptions of the place of both romance and pleasure in history by creating stories that push at imposed boundaries. Writers of historical romance are essential to breaking stereotypes surrounding the history of sex in Africa.

With that said, there are still so many spaces that remain unexplored, boundaries that remain to be pushed, in order to create a more complex mosaic of this history.


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